Slippery Rocky Surface – A Photo Challenge

I have been an avid observer for some time for the Tuesday photo challenge on Dutch Goes the Photo however hitting the required timeline has been problematic. I mean its not that hard, the subject/topic is released on Tuesday and must be submitted by Sunday but I keep getting those two mixed up.

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The topic released on Tuesday was surface and with that in mind I dug through the photos that have been taken in the last month or so and found this little gem of a slippery rocky surface that fits the requirements for the photo challenge.

Do you like photo challenges, if so jump over to Dutch Goes the Photo and join in the fun.

Happy shooting

Sunset at Black Rocks

Reading a post from 35hunter about ‘How many photographs should we share in one blog Post‘ had me rushing to review how many photos have been included on this blog and the result is on average 3-5 photos per post. Dan raises an interesting question for sure, which I don’t think is easily answered however Dan made a statement about a single photograph. This statement has really stuck with me for about a week and I can’t seem to shake it, Dan states that:

‘With a very short post that can be purely the photograph with no text, or the photograph plus a few paragraphs of text, I find this approach can be very powerful.

I love the author’s commitment – “This is the single photograph I have chosen for the post, nothing else would do, and now here it is standing up proud”.

I think it encourages those of us reading to give that single photograph more commitment too, to perhaps linger a little longer, and search a little deeper, than we may do if there are two or three other images in the post.’

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I do whole heartedly agree with that statement because as society we have become numb to the sheer volume of images across our social media streams. The effect is most people, including me, scroll without thought or using any brain power.

So I thought that I would apply this thought process to a least one blog post this year but Dan also states that it should be your best work, obviously showcasing your skills as a photographer (or other creative work) but if I did that I would never post any photos as I don’t think I’m yet to produce my best work.

Please jump on over to 35hunter to say Hello and have a look around and ask yourself when was the last time you looked at a single image longer than 0.3 of second and appreciated a photograph.

And I’m curious how many photos you post to your favourite social, either Insta, Facebook or blog?

Happy Shooting

 

Most Popular Post – 2018

I have no idea why but the most popular post for 2018 wasn’t even written in 2018. I originally wrote this blog post in 2011 and to this day, still attracts viewers. Drum roill please, The most popular blog post of 2018 is 12 Real Landscape Photography Tips

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Some of these tips are, to be honest, are real obvious but how many times have you gone out to take photos and not known the tides or worn incorrect footwear, left the torch at home etc. We’ve all done it at some stage and I’m still forgetting something. For example, recently I had to hold the filters in front of the lens because I forgot the filter holder attachment and I knew exactly where it was, at home!

Maybe I should add ‘Don’t forget filter holder attachment’ and change the name to 13 Real Landscape Photography tips.

Let me know in the comments if you have any tips that should be added to the list.

Icons in Summer

Photographers are Eveyrwhere

Icons, they are incredibly hard to photograph. They have been photographed from nearly every angle and all hours of the day and night but I still can’t help myself photographing a famous icon such as the Sydney Opera House. The other thing that I always seem to notice is that when I do photograph these icons, there are photographers everywhere, absolutely everywhere also photographing these great icons.

Happy Shooting