Your photos are very Political!

2020 has influenced the way many of us photograph our chosen subjects, with COVID safe plans in place to being watched, and some, fined by the police to being locked down and not leaving the house to pursue our passion for photography. To that end, I have been forced to take a ‘what’s happening in my city?’ and a ‘am I allowed out?’ approach to photography.

Antidote Required

The came these bombshell comment from a colleague, ‘Your photos are very political!’ only to be further echoed by other colleagues leaving me scrambling to justify my choice of subjects. I noted as they scrolled through my Instagram feed none of them mentioned or commented on composition, cropping or even the editing technique etc. but rather commented on the theme behind each image.

Power

I like to think that I’m the same as everyone else who enjoys photography, we are all, in our own way trying to tell a story with each and every single photograph and politics or a political theme is something I have gone out of my way to avoid by putting my efforts into capturing the emotions of people attending and the emotion around the event.

Sadness

These comments stuck with me for quite sometime only to realise that you may inadvertently capture the politics surrounding the event whilst trying to capture peoples emotions.

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Until next time, happy shooting……….

The Sunday Snap 14

Whilst film photography is not  my main method creating images but rather I find that helps to remain creative whilst reminding you to be cognizant of how many shots you can take. There is no snapping away unless you have a healthy budget to buy and develop film.

DSC_0301 1

Nikon F75, FP4 Ilford, ISO 125, F8, 35mm B&W film

This gentleman is a lovely bloke and was really easy to chat to, which only made it easier to ask permission to take his photo.

Hope everyone has a great Sunday, until next time…..

 

 

Old Man, Old City

There were only a few hours that were available to wander through the back streets of the Old City in Jeruslam. The sounds and sights added to the overwhelmng feeling that before me, potentially millions of people from all walks of life had walked these streets, I stood looking at the surrounding buildings and stared into a darkened room struggling to make out the lone figure sitting in a chair. As I entered I noticed the room was filled full of rugs and towards the rear was a younger man in the middle of a sale with a couple.

The Old Man

I approached the old man and asked, as pointed to my camera, if he minded if I took his photo, he nodded his head yes and I took one photo, just one. I showed him the photo and in a fleeting moment we had connected. As time was short, I left in a hurry in search of another photo oppotunity.

Going the extra step, being a little curious can lead to unexpected photo opportunties.

Happy Shooting