Forgotten Moments

Even though I have achieved any sort of real improvement shooting 35mm film, I find that I’m still drawn to the medium and continue to shoot but have become incredibly lazy having the film developed. Spending time at home provided an opportunity to have those rolls developed and it resulted in a walk down memory lane.

B&W Film Scout 1

The old rolls of Kodak colour in the bottom of a box for almost 20 years ago encouraged me to have them and others developed. As I dropped them off, I was informed the very old rolls may have or may not have any photos due to the age and I shouldn’t get my hopes up but I was pleasantly surprised. They’re not excellent but just ok.

B&W Film Scout

The Black and White rolls weren’t nearly as old as the colour and looking through the negatives I find that it’s taken me about 2 years to shoot 24 exposures. This may be because I want to make each frame count, considering you only get one shot at it. There is no instant confirmation your photo was exposed or even framed properly.

Now the task is to scan and process the remaining negatives and remember to shoot and develop more often as there are many forgotten moments.

Until next time, Happy shooting

Film – It’s got Character!

It took over a week but finally the roll of film has come back from the lab and I must say that it wasn’t without incident. When I dropped the roll of film off I specifically asked the sales guys for the film to be developed, scanned to disk in TIFF format and no need for prints. I left the shop with a gut feeling that the sales guy hadn’t even recorded my request in the system. Turns out I should have checked before I left, as they say hindsight is 20/20. What returned from the lab wasn’t what was asked for except that the images were burnt to disk in JPEG format and in a slideshow program that won’t open on a Mac. The frustrations grew even further. Pretty disappointed and vowing not to use the camera shop/lab again I looked at the prints (that I hadn’t ordered) and wondered how I was going to scan the negatives into Capture One Pro. With several futile attempts I found that I could open the images on a PC and transferred them to the Mac using a USB stick. Finally a sigh of relief.

f1000002

MG

After a few days of holding and feeling the prints in my hands I started to really like what I had created. The photos had character which is something that seems to be lacking with digital. Sure digital is a lot easier but having the finished product in your hands after waiting a week or more, to me at least, is being creative.

f1000001

Bugatti No 5

I know that there are a lot of filters etc that replicate film available but the colours, the texture, the graininess is something that is pretty hard to replicate with digital and a few filters.

f1000003

MG No 3.

and then there is the need to get it right as there is no second chance at all. Shooting film takes discipline.

f1000004

I haven’t done that much to the images except for a few tweaks like straighten because I usually lean to the right when I shoot. I need to put a rock under my foot to remind me to straighten up first.

f1000006

Loaded up and ready to go

Photographing balloons without a tripod becomes difficult and one of these didn’t make the cut because its pretty blurry.

f1000007

f1000008

f1000009

Ballroom in NSW State Parliament

f1000010

f1000011

Mungo Beach

f1000012

f1000015f1000016

Normally this image of sunset at Bare Island, La Perouse would be almost salvageable using image software but not this time. Live and Learn!

f1000018

f1000017

f1000019

f1000020

Historic House at Hill End

f1000021

Historic House at Hill End

f1000022

f1000023

This was an enjoyable experience and has driven me to continue down the path of film photography. There is a roll of B&W loaded into my Nikon F75 with a few shots already taken and plans to shoot the remainder of the roll.