Your photos are very Political!

2020 has influenced the way many of us photograph our chosen subjects, with COVID safe plans in place to being watched, and some, fined by the police to being locked down and not leaving the house to pursue our passion for photography. To that end, I have been forced to take a ‘what’s happening in my city?’ and a ‘am I allowed out?’ approach to photography.

Antidote Required

The came these bombshell comment from a colleague, ‘Your photos are very political!’ only to be further echoed by other colleagues leaving me scrambling to justify my choice of subjects. I noted as they scrolled through my Instagram feed none of them mentioned or commented on composition, cropping or even the editing technique etc. but rather commented on the theme behind each image.

Power

I like to think that I’m the same as everyone else who enjoys photography, we are all, in our own way trying to tell a story with each and every single photograph and politics or a political theme is something I have gone out of my way to avoid by putting my efforts into capturing the emotions of people attending and the emotion around the event.

Sadness

These comments stuck with me for quite sometime only to realise that you may inadvertently capture the politics surrounding the event whilst trying to capture peoples emotions.

If you enjoyed this blog post, please hit the like and subscribe button.

Until next time, happy shooting……….

The Sunday Snap 18

Friday marked the 19th anniversary of the horrific and tragic events which unfolded in New York on 11 Sept 2001. Sadly, 2977 people never returned home to their loved ones including five members of the FDNY Ladder 10.

Their names will not be forgotten and their memories will live on. Please take a moment to remember those who have gone before us.

Until next time…….

The Sunday Snap 17

Walking the esplanade in Tel Aviv, Israel I spotted a group waiting for the sun to set whilst having drinks and chatting with friends, just on the edge of a building.

Sunset Drinks

It strikes me that they showed no fear of heights and were pretty casual about it. It seemed more like a daily ritual than a once off.

For those in celebrating Fathers Day today, Happy Fathers Day.

Until next time, happy shooting

P.S Please note, Flickr presents photos better and by clicking on the image you will be taken to my Flickr gallery.

The Sunday Snap 16

Moving through the crowd at a BLM rally I spotted this young lady and asked if I could take her photo, she turned and directly engaged the camera by looking down the barrel, I pressed the shutter, thanked her and walked away. Something I now regret.

A Real Aussie

These regrets could have been avoided for a couple of reasons

  • Didn’t spend enough time with her to have her pose properly but its still worked out
  • Didn’t ask her name or email address so a print or digital file could be sent to her.
  • Realized that this is one of those photos you keep going back to over time.

I also learnt I need to slow down photographing protests, this is not easy as most are pretty fluid, filled withe emotion and can turn violent in the blink of an eye, however there is also a fear of not capturing the event in its entirety.

Until next time, happy shooting.

Please note: due to limited space on WP, a full-size version is available at Flickr which can be seen by clicking on the photo. Flickr presents the photo better

The Sunday Snap 15

Over 500 photos were taken during the BLM protest and now I am wondering what to do with them all. Sure the blurry, poorly exposed and badly composed images can be deleted but once the cull has happened there will still be around 300 images that need to be edited, but then what. What do you do with so many images?

Full size image can be viewed by clicking on the image

They can’t all be posted on social media or here because people switch off and loose interest.

Some will be printed and hung on the wall above my desk to stare at when I’m struggling to think of the right word or ideas for a blog post. Maybe the best photos should be collated into a coffee table book to be thumbed through by visitors.

What do you do with all of your photos, Do they sit on a hard drive or do you print your best work to show to either family and friends or enter into competitions? Would love to know what you do, because I’ve run out of ideas.

Until next time happy shooting.

Please Note: Full size image can be viewed by clicking on the image. You will be take Flickr to where the image is stored. This has been done to save space here on WordPress and Flickr presents the image a lot better.

The Sunday Snap 14

Whilst film photography is not  my main method creating images but rather I find that helps to remain creative whilst reminding you to be cognizant of how many shots you can take. There is no snapping away unless you have a healthy budget to buy and develop film.

DSC_0301 1

Nikon F75, FP4 Ilford, ISO 125, F8, 35mm B&W film

This gentleman is a lovely bloke and was really easy to chat to, which only made it easier to ask permission to take his photo.

Hope everyone has a great Sunday, until next time…..

 

 

The Sunday Snap 13

It’s been quite some time I’ve participated in the 52 week Smartphone challenge due to world events. Fortunately today was an opportunity to get out with family to see some sights, support local businesses and take some photographs.


The Ferris Wheel in Freemantle screams out to be photographed, plenty of leading lines and the red gondolas are contrasted nicely against the blue sky. 

Photographed using a Samsung Note 10 and processed using snapped.

Until next time, stay safe and happy shooting

Would you pay $108 for Social Media?

The search to share my photography on a suitable social media platform has been ongoing for some time and along the way I discovered some unusual platforms like Vero and MeWe, only to realise they were either clunky or didn’t suit me or my needs. There are the usual suspects such as Instagram and Facebook but due to the ever-present privacy issues surrounding Facebook reminded me why I’ll never go back to Facebook.

Storage here on WordPress is also starting to become a problem where I will either need to upgrade my account or find alternatives such as cloud storage or share directly from social media accounts. Neither of these options interested me due to likely ongoing associated costs, quality control etc. It was about the same time that I learnt of the open letter from Don MacAskill, Flickr CEO about their financial situation.

Prompted by Don’s open letter to take a look at Flickr left me wondering why I originally left. Was there something else that was (perceived to be) better come along or was it because all of my family and friends were on platforms like Facebook, without any real answer I signed up for a free account.

Screen Shot 2020-06-07 at 2.50.30 pm

This solved the storage problem and Flickr is a pretty good alternative to Facebook, not to mention the perks associated with a pro account like discounted Adobe products, camera bags and 50% off SmuMug Subscription so after a week or so, I signed up for a Pro account.

And I didn’t want to see a social media company such as Flickr fall only to leave Facebook owned platforms. That would be boring and quite frankly horrible.

But I have one gripe which hits me in the wallet, the true cost of a Flickr Pro account.

For reference, costs for a Flickr Pro account have been taken directly from Flickr’s pricing FAQ

  •  The USA – The price for an annual subscription is USD $59.99, plus tax
  •  International – (where the countries currency is not yet supported) is USD $71.88, tax inclusive.

However what is not considered in the pricing structure is the exchange rate and for Australia, an annual subscription cost is normally over $100. When I signed up In February this year the cost was just over $108.00. At the time of writing, the cost of a Flickr Pro at $103.18.

I also know the folks at Flickr have as much influence over the exchange rate as I do but we live in a global online community where we should be all charged the same amount to sign up regardless of where you live.

Now before you go jumping on your keyboard sending me all sorts of angry comments, let’s look back to the past. For e.g. Adobe charged more for software (Photoshop) that was digitally downloaded. A considerable amount more which resulted in Australians becoming well known for pirating the required software and licenses. Thankfully, for the most part, this has changed as companies adopted a subscription business model.

So I would like to ask Don MacAskill, Flickr CEO to take a similar approach to Adobe, Nextflix and Spotify to consider charging the same amount regardless of where we live in the world. The result may be more people becoming a Flickr Pro members if we all pay the same ultimately saving the company.

Would love to know your thoughts so drop us comment below

Until next time